Yara’s expansion project at Herøya in full swing – acid plant demolished

Yara’s expansion project worth more than NOK 2.2 billion is in full swing. There is lots going on at the project office, with people chatting in Norwegian, English, Finnish and Spanish. Around 60 people are on site, and more are set to join them. 

Herøya Industripark. The old nitric acid plant is being demolished in order to make space for the new one. Site manager Olav Storkaas (left) and project manager Jostein Braaten.

The old nitric acid plant is being demolished in order to make space for the new one. Site manager Olav Storkaas (left) and project manager Jostein Braaten. 

Demolition of the old nitric acid plant SS1Q has begun, and the designing of the compound fertiliser and calcium nitrate expansions is taking place at the same time.

Three-part project

The project known as Yara Bamboo Porsgrunn (because bamboo grows quickly) is made of up three elements. Two of the subprojects are working on expansions to the compound fertiliser and calcium nitrate site. Finnish company Pöyry is responsible for design work, procurement and, later, site monitoring for these subprojects and has mobilised a team of its own at the office. 

Yara’s own team of people from Project Office in Brussels is made up of around 25 people, and selected individuals from the operation and maintenance organisation at Yara Porsgrunn will also be providing expertise and experience from the specific sites.

From Madrid

The new nitric acid plant is the third subproject. Spanish company Tecnicas Reunidas has been contracted to design and construct the new plant. Most of the design work is based in Madrid at the moment. 

“The old acid plant will be demolished in April. When the site has been cleared, people from Tecnicas Reunidas will come to Herøya in order to start preparing for the construction of the new plant,” explains Jostein Braaten. According to the plan, construction work will begin by the summer.

Pöyry staff have taken up temporary residence in Grenland, and the staff from Spain will be doing the same from the summer onwards, making a positive contribution to the local rental market.  

Enquiries out

Preparation of enquiry packs is currently in progress at the moment, too. “We will be approaching the Scandinavian market over Easter with enquiries relating to modification and installation. We have already received a lot of calls from potential suppliers, and we are expecting to see a lot of interest in these commissions,” emphasises Braaten.  

The first work will be done on the calcium nitrate plant in week 13 in late March. The compound fertiliser and calcium nitrate plants will then undergo a planned stoppage for maintenance.

“During this stoppage, we will be installing what are known as ‘tie-ins’, whereby the old and new plants will be linked together. Once this is done, the project can carry on working while the plants are operational,” says project manager Braaten.

See also  Yara expanding fertiliser capacity at Herøya and  Yara “bamboo” project at Herøya in the melting pot